INSPIRATIONAL WOMAN | NASA Astronaut Christina Kock Returns To Earth After Record Mission

MILAN | ITALY – – U.S. astronaut Christina Kock, who led the first all-female spacewalk in 2019, landed in Kazakhstan on Thursday after a record stay in the International Space Station, ending a 328-day mission expected to yield new insights into deep-space travel.

The Soyuz MS-13 capsule touched down on the Kazakh desert stepped at 4:12 am ET carrying Koch, 41, European astronaut Luca Parmitano and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Sckortsov.

Koch’s mission broke the record for the longest continuous stay in space by a woman, previously held by NASA’s Peggy Whitson.

She also achieved a gender milestone in a relatively routine spacewalk with fellow NASA astronaut Jessica Meir last October that marked the first time two women stepped out of the space station at the same time.

NASA’s first attempt for all-female spacewalk in March 2019 was called off because one of the astronauts’ medium-sized spacesuits was not properly configured in advance, igniting a gender-equity debate with the space community.

Astronauts on the space station, whose 20th anniversary in low-Earth orbit comes later this year, have tallied 227 maintenance spacewalks, nearly two dozen of which included women astronauts, according to NASA. Koch and Meir conducted two more spacewalks together in January.

NASA said Koch’s lengthy mission will provide researchers with much-needed data on how he weightlessness of gravity and space radiation affects the female body on long-duration spaceflights.

The science, to be studies in the coming months, could prove useful for the U.S. space agency’s aim of building a permanent space station on the moon’s surface within the next decade.

U.S astronaut Scott Kelly’s 340 days in orbit starting in 2015 demonstrated that long-term spaceflight causes human health effects such as thickening of the carotid artery and retina, changes in gene expression and slight cognitive impairment for men.


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